Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Re-grow Romaine lettuce Hearts

I saw this on a The Grumpy Gardener (I think) and decided to try it.



Just save the end from your lettuce and put into a little water (about a half inch). Change out the water every day. The lettuce will grow back incredibly quick too.


The best and most amazing thing about lettuce, besides eating it, is that if the stump is intact it will regenerate and regrow new shoots for a second harvest. I took three photos romaine “stumps” in various levels of regrowth in my herb garden. All I did was put each stump in a half inch of water, check the level daily, and wait for tender new growth. I've also planted the stump right in the ground and had success as well when the weather is cool.



The perfect environment for re-growing leafy greens is a cool and bright window with all day light. Give it a try the next time you have a head of lettuce with the stem still intact. You have nothing to lose and a free harvest of lettuce to gain.



Important Tip: Romaine Lettuce is one type of produce that is easy to find in the organic form. It is often packaged as three heart of romaine and it pays to spend just a dollar or two more and have your salad free from any unnecessary pesticides.



I understand it works with celery as well.

3 comments:

  1. I have tried growing romaine from seed and this method and both grew these small, not very crunchy, rather bitter leaves. How do you get the big flavorful leaves that are sold in the store? What am I doing wrong.

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  2. From what I've read, if lettuce is grown in hot or very warm conditions the leaves will be bitter. This could be the reason your lettuce is tasting like that.

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  3. Mary Franz, that happened to me, too. It wasn't just Romaine, either; happened with a Mesclun Mix and another whose name I've forgotten. All of them were bitter, from the large sturdy cos lettuce to the softer mesclun. It can get rather hot here, and I planted the seeds quite late. Should one just wait for regrowth, or is it really the temperature that makes them bitter?

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